Who We Help

  • ox uni logo

    Oxford University

    This is a 3 year research project by Professor Lars Fugger and his team at Oxford University. This exciting project involves looking at the improvement in MS that occurs during pregnancy and the factors that cause MS to often worsen in the few months after the pregnancy. The MS changes in pregnancy have been recognised for some time and are thought to be due to alterations in the immune system. Now, using new technologies which have become available in recent years , the actual mechanisms which allow these changes in MS will be investigated. The team will look at many different factors in the blood of women before, during and after pregnancy comparing  those with and without MS. This study may yield information relating to physiological mechanisms by which the disease can be modified for therapeutic benefit. As MS is a disease which often affects young people including women of child bearing age, this is a very important study which we hope will produce some very useful data and information.

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    King’s College London

    “Bowel Dysfunction in MS…”
    Aims2Cure is very pleased to be funding this project in partnership with the MS Society. The research is by Professor Christine Norton and her team at The Florence Nightingale School of Nursing at King’s College, London. This is a topic which is often not addressed in view of the embarrassing nature of the problem and the difficulties that some have discussing it. The study aims to look at faecal incontinence in MS, the impact this can have and also the input and support that health care professionals provide in these circumstances. It will include experiences of those with MS and their family carers with regard to living with and managing MS-related bowel dysfunction and the support and help given for self-management. We hope that using this information, the team will be able to produce care pathway options for those with MS and their carers to help in dealing with this important issue which can significantly affect the quality of daily life of those with MS.

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    The Chilterns MS Centre

    Aims2Cure has a close association with The Chilterns MS Centre. Based in Halton, Buckinghamshire, the centre provides a range of drug-free symptomatic management therapies for anyone with MS no matter where they live, as well as help and advice to their families and carers. In March 2016, Aims2Cure donated a huge £15,000 to help fund the cost of their much needed Physiotherapists. Physio can help tackle a wide range of problems for people with MS including increasing physical independence, mobility and fitness.  We are delighted that since July 2008, Aims2Cure have donated in total a massive £69,000.

    http://www.chilternsmscentre.org

  • heart for ME fund

    The Michele Elster Fund

    In 2007, Aims2Cure established the Michele Elster Fund. Michele was a wonderful young woman who tragically died from MS in 2006. The fund was set up in her name to help other MS sufferers with their everyday lives by alleviating some of the obstacles life may present. In the past few years, we have purchased a scooter to help with mobility; enabled a garden to be decked so that an individual is no longer confined to the house; adapted a car to help a young mother with the school run; revamped a bathroom with essential equipment to ease the daily routine. This type of help is essential and makes such a difference to the lives of MS sufferers. With the blessing of Michele’s family, Aims2Cure have been able to make this difference.

  • Blizzard Institute, Barts

    Centre for Neuroscience & Trauma

    Centre for Neuroscience & Trauma, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine & Dentistry.

    Whitechapel, London E1.

    Prof. Gavin Giovannoni

    Donated £95,000 to various research projects

  • Institute of Neurology

    The Institute of Neurology

    The Institute of Neurology (part of the University of London and affiliated to The National Hospital for Nervous Diseases).

    Queen Square, London WC1

    Dr. Jennifer Pocock

    Donated £465,000 to various research projects